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What about this "Showcase"?

Young Professionals' Showcase Room is a space where portraits of Active and Inspirational Young Professionals in Agricultural Development are displayed. You also would like to tell your story? Register and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.!

What is the purpose of this and what do you gain from it?

YPARD team believes that sharing experience enables:

  • informing on good practices and lessons learned
  • generating thoughts and ideas for optimizing activities
  • inspiring each other for more innovation and entrepreneurship
  • ...and more!

With the aim of applying the knowledge and skills she gained during her Masters in Crop Biotechnology, Smita Shrestha returned to her home country, Nepal in 2011 and started working in government organizations related to her field.

Its during this period, that she gained experience in production of improved crops via marker assisted selection (molecular biology). She also learned the skills on conventional breeding techniques during her one year internship at a renowned institution in Nepal before starting her Masters. Along with this, she has been part of a seed conservation project for medicinal plants and PCR diagnosis of Citrus greening disease in Nepal.

After completing her MSc Business Economics and Finance from University of Surrey, U.K in 2010, Nikki Chaudhary  returned to India and got into Dairy Farming and Poplar based Agroforestry at her family farm in rural part of Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.

“I am deeply involved in Dairy from the last five years wherein I look after Cow Health and Nutrition part of Dairy Management, which are my key work areas. I have worked in detail on Cow Comfort and Cow Nutrition which are essential for high quality raw milk production.Dairy Farming has its own challenges and to become an efficient milk producer on a commercial scale, one needs to have very good know how on livestock management, fodders and cattle health issues. “ says Nikki

“Empowering women and girls in pursuing agriculture-related careers, train entrepreneurship skills will not only accelerate economic growth but also will mitigate the effects of financial crisis by improving life standards of poor families in rural and urban area”,  These are amazing words by Sitora Khabibova one of the online mentoring program for young women entrepreneurs program.

In line with addressing this gap, Sitora is kickstarting a project, “Save the Talent” that she is passionate about. The project is a response to the increasing lack of skills, interest, limited access to job opportunities and insufficient participation of women and youth in agriculture.

Lalaina  Nirina, a Malagasy citizen has been involved in agricultural activities since 2011. A computer scientist engineer by training, she currently works as a website developer for a private company in Madagascar.

And after working with agricultural related associations, she began to appreciate agriculture and has since been involved in agricultural activities. This in turn saw her enter the agribusiness sector where she cultivated beans in her parent’s land with the export business in mind.

This success story written by Justin Kakumba a Gender activist ,is part of the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series features, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

My name is Justin Kakumba Hagena and i am from Rwanda. I hold a bachelor's degree in Agriculture and Rural Development from the Univeristy of Rwanda and  I have eight years of experience working at Millenia 2015 (Women actors of development for global challenges) as a young volunteer who is passionate about gender-related issues. I mostly work with communities in the fight against gender-based violence and promoting positive masculinity.

This success story written by Wendy Nicolas-Morales,a Gender in development specialist , is part of the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series features, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

My name is Wendy Nicolás-Morales and I am from Mexico. I studied mybachelor’s degree in the Universidad Autónoma Chapingo and later on obtained the master degree in the Agris Mundus program on Rural Development and Food Security.

This success story written by Taryn Devereux, a Gender in agriculture specialist , is part of the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series features, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

I write this post from Kabul, Afghanistan, where I am currently working for the next few weeks on behalf of the University of Maryland for their Women in Agriculture (WIA) program, which is part of a consortium of universities that run the USAID-funded Afghanistan Agricultural Extension Project (AAEP-II). I’ve been here less than a week and have already visited a demonstration garden in Kabul, traveled to another project site in Balkh to visit Farmer Field Schools (FFS) and the women who run them, experienced my first earthquake, met with the AAEP-II and USAID leadership based here in Afghanistan, and talked to WIA team members and female Afghan extension agents about their experiences with the program. This is the pace of WIA, and it speaks to the drive and dedication of the team.

This success story written by,Bidhya Shrestha  an agricultural graduate and a former Livelihood Coordinator at World Vision Nepal,  is part of the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series features, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

My name is Bidhya Shrestha. I was born in small village of Chitwan district in Nepal and my house is next to the Institute of Agriculture and Animal Science (IAAS) in Rampur, Chitwan. I grew up with aspirations to graduate from this institute as it was considered prestigious to be a part of it. As luck would have it, I successfully completed my Bachelors’ of Agriculture Science in the Institute in December 2010.

How did Noah, an IT specialist, become a very successful full-time farmer? It was during a visit to a client in Angola where he was installing new networking equipment. He went to the villages and saw how hunger was affecting people even though they had fertile soils. He thought and said to himself; ‘I have to do something back home’.

Back home he received a gift of land from his father in-law (an experienced farmer) and his new career was born.

Society and funding bodies are increasingly demanding that scientists take the stage and communicate their research clearly and effectively to diverse audiences. This isn’t a skill that Irene Kagera – a young research scientist – feels super confident with, but unlike many of her counterparts, she’s proactively doing something about it.  

“I believe that the future belongs to those who prepare for it. By enrolling in the YPARD mentoring program, I hope to overcome my public speaking fears and stand out from my research peers.”

Like many youths in Kenya, Catherine is a juggler. By day, Catherine is a certified public accountant, keeping an eye on Murang’a University College’s accounts. By night, she is an entrepreneur tending to 600 head of chicken. Much to her surprise, her agri-business is outrunning her main job; it is generating more income than what she earns as a trained accountant.

She also has a son who loves fruit. Yellow passion fruits to be specific. But she dismayed at the amount of added sugar that Kenya’s imported passion fruit juice contains.

Growing up, Lencer Ochele wanted to be many things - a doctor, an engineer, a pilot and a lawyer but not a farmer. She didn’t really see successful farmers in her village so it wasn’t a profession she dreamed of. A number of spirited youth in agriculture campaigns changed all that.

Lencer comes from a humble background where meeting the basic family needs was a challenge. She was frequently pulled out of high school as her family struggled to pay her school fees so she never finished her secondary education.

by Amelia Ochoa

After more than a year of exciting and memorable stint with YPARD, today I am bidding farewell to the YPARD community to pursue other opportunities. As I move on, I’d like to take a moment to remember and cherish our times together.  

Justus Ochieng hails from the Kenya’s Nyanza region. A region well known for its huge fish production, his parents were farmers and his interest in agriculture was instigated during his childhood. He saw both the good and bad in agriculture - he saw some rich farmers effectively farming and making huge profits and others who were too poor to even afford seeds to plant. He therefore decided that he was going to help improve the way farming was done in his village.

Justus lives by the mantra: “In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure”. His desire for success has made him self-starter always going for opportunities and not waiting for them to come his way.

This success story written by Yasmeen Atta, founder of  the Youth Sinai Foundation for Development and Human Rights and the Youth Sinai Development Company, is part of the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series features, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

I was born in a rural Bedouin community in North Sinai Governorate, Egypt. My older brother graduated from the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Rural Development, and received a PhD in rural development. Thanks to him and to my rural background, I got interested in agriculture since I was little.

Agriculture is the mainstay of any economy, and is fundamental to social economic development of any nation. This is because agriculture represents a strategic asset to the overall well-being of a country’s economy. It provides food, clothing, and generates foreign exchange among others.

This is why it’s very pitiful that in a great country like Nigeria filled with agricultural potential and development, the profession has waned considerably, as agriculture represents a third of the nation’s GDP while in 2014, it was the largest in Africa with around $500 billion.

My name is Eric Izerimana and I’m a recent agricultural graduate from the University of Rwanda, College of Agriculture, Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine. I am a District Coordinator at GAI Ltd where I organize the activities of more than five agronomists assisting farmers’ activities on 100 Ha in both Musanze and Burera districts, Northern Province, Rwanda.

“GAI” is a Kinyarwanda abbreviation meaning “Gira Agronome Iwawe”, which in English is “Have Yourself an Agronomist.” My role is to contribute to poverty eradication in Rwanda by increasing sustainable agricultural production based on the culture of agribusiness and extension among farmers.

Like millions of other urban dwellers growing up in big cities like Nairobi, John knows the limitations of space all too well. But he also knows how much can be achieved with very little. In their small plot of land on the outskirts of Nairobi, his parents practiced urban farming – keeping poultry, dairy and pigs.

“Being a farmer is like becoming a famous musician - you work hard, but no one knows how hard you truly worked to make it, except yourself.”

“If you don't build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.” Nancy Mwaniki borrows these words from Tony Gaskins to deliver a strong message to all the mentees.

She believes that the YPARD mentoring program will help all the mentees discover themselves and start building their dreams.   

Sarah Ogalleh is determined to be a catalyst for change in her society.

For nearly a decade, she has been tirelessly working to combat retrogressive traditional beliefs that have stifled development. She does this by equipping farmers—both men and women— with knowledge and means to manage their environment, using scientific facts and participatory methodologies that the local people can understand.