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What about this "Showcase"?

Young Professionals' Showcase Room is a space where portraits of Active and Inspirational Young Professionals in Agricultural Development are displayed. You also would like to tell your story? Register and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.!

What is the purpose of this and what do you gain from it?

YPARD team believes that sharing experience enables:

  • informing on good practices and lessons learned
  • generating thoughts and ideas for optimizing activities
  • inspiring each other for more innovation and entrepreneurship
  • ...and more!

A swimmer, a dancer, a reader and an agriculture lover are the adjectives best used to describe Alphaxard (Alpha) - a youthful farmer who has found agriculture not only rewarding but also a career that allows him time to engage in fun activities. It also helps him to exercise too.

Contrary to the belief that agriculture is for those who have not schooled, Alpha is a graduate of economics from the University of Nairobi and he chose to use his education to grow his farming business and work on youth development and empowerment projects.

This success story is the second one of a series that spotlight IAAS members' experiences in agricultural development. YPARD-IAAS series will feature, every two weeks, young champions from different regions of the world.

I got in the field of agriculture without even realizing it. Just like most young girls I dreamt of working in an office wearing heals the whole day with makeup on my face. My parents would ask me to water the garden and I would enjoy doing it because that way, I could have more time to fantasize of my office job.

By Muthoni Mugo

Allan Migaili started earning a livelihood in agriculture from a young age. The first born of five children, Allan hails from a humble family and despite doing exceedingly well in his primary education, he could not afford fees for his high school education. He therefore relied on sponsorship and the Palmhouse Foundation came in and paid for his high school education. He says no amount of words can express his gratitude to his personal sponsor and mentor Mr Erick Kimani from the Palmhouse organization. It was in high school that his interest in agriculture arose. He learned that majority of the funds that Palmhouse Foundation provided came from Palmhouse Dairies. This came as a surprise to him, as he did not imagine that a company as small as Palmhouse Dairies, and for that matter an agricultural institution, could produce such significant amount of funding.

My name is Elisabetta Demartis. I’m a passionate Italian girl about innovation and development who discovered Africa in 2013, when I moved to Nairobi for 3 months during the presidential elections.

The reason that pushed me there was the curiosity to study for my Master thesis how a crowdsourcing digital innovation like Ushahidi crowdmap was able to track disorders and events in the slums in order to prevent post-election violence. After my graduation in Development Economics I moved to Senegal in 2014 for six months, for a research project in partnership with my university (Univesity of Turin) and the Senegalese Institute of Agricultural researches (ISRA). The goal was to discover and map the local initiatives and enterprises working with the ICT in the primary sector. 

By Elcah Barasa

Sally Musungu’s interest in farming was inculcated in her at a tender age. She was born and brought up in Western Kenya in a small village called Amagoro in Teso district in a farming family where she experienced farming firsthand. She saw her parents struggle with crop pests and diseases, she saw them struggle to keep their harvests without going bad, she saw their harvests reduce per acreage every season. This was sufficient to trigger her interest in farming and she decided to help her family increase its agricultural production.

By Elcah Barasa

It has been often said that an apple does not fall far away from the tree and this seems to hold true for Esther Ndichu. Her grandparents were farmers, her parents are farmers and she is one too - an apple does not fall far from the tree indeed.

By Elcah Barasa

Agriculture is the mainstay of the Kenyan economy – about 70 percent of the entire population depends on agriculture. However, many people continue to shy away from the sector with some viewing it as a dirty enterprise with little returns despite its heavy labour demand. Students opt for other courses because they see farming as a punishment by God because in both primary and secondary schools, working on the school farm was used as a punishment for the students who erred. For Emily Ongus, what you see depends on how you view the world; to them, this is just dirt. For her, it’s a potential. 

This success story is the first one of a series that spotlight IAAS members' experiences in agricultural development. YPARD-IAAS series will feature, every two weeks, young champions from different regions of the world. 

By Ratih Nawangwulan

Story written by Oluwaseun Johnson

I never planned to study entomology or be a beekeeper. Actually I enrolled in the school of Biological Sciences hoping to be a medical doctor.

After having worked with the Community Development Department in its land services in Ngozi town, Firmin saw how poor the rural community is in his region due to the exploitation of small plots of cultivable land.

He realized that there was the need of some measures requiring permanent stabling of animals, as goats and cattle breeding was not adapted to the fact of not having enough land to raise them. Therefore, he started analysing and saw what was the solution that seemed beneficial to this great community in poverty.

This success story written by Afrina Choudhury, Gender Specialist at the WorldFish, is part of the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series will feature, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

It’s interesting what Gender professionals connote in people’s minds when they hear it and it’s not always good. 

This success story written by Michelle Jambui, Fulbright scholar graduate student, is part of the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series will feature, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

… Started in 2006 when I was awarded a New Zealand aid scholarship on empowering women in agriculture. The scholarship was focused on women taking up tertiary education in the agricultural field.

Story captured by Amelia Ochoa, as part of the series "Thought For Food Global Summit - Building the next generation's powerhouse." Check out the success story of YPARD Trinidad and Tobago representative, Keron Bascombe. A youth champion who participated in the Though For Food Global Summit 2015 as young ambassador.

Which workshops have you found the most interesting at the Thought For Food Global Summit 2015?

Story captured by Amelia Ochoa, as part of the series "Thought For Food Global Summit - Building the next generation's powerhouse." Check out the success story of Alpha Sennon, a youth champion who participated in the Though For Food Global Summit 2015 as young ambassador.

Which workshops have you found the most interesting at the Thought For Food Global Summit 2015?

Story captured by Amelia Ochoa, as part of the series "Thought For Food Global Summit - Building the next generation's powerhouse." Check out the success story of Luke Smith, a youth champion who participated in the Though For Food Global Summit 2015 as young ambassador.

Which workshops have you found the most interesting at the Thought For Food Global Summit 2015?

By Jean-Claude Kamwenubusa, founder and President of the Association pour la Solidarité et l’Assistance Socio-Sanitaire (ASASS-BURUNDI), from Burundi.

ICTs together with my willing to become more involved in agriculture and environment preservation activities in my beloved country, Burundi, helped me to find out YPARD via a collaborator charity in United Kingdom which partners with an organization on agricultural research and education I am representative of - Association pour la Solidarité et l’Assistance Socio-Sanitaire (ASASS-BURUNDI). Ever since, I have eagerly followed the activities and updates on this platform for young professionals in agricultural development.

Story written by Akintunde Akinmolayan, Career Advisor, Communications & Business Development manager at Temitope Farms. 

Year 2014 came with so much anticipation: I had joined the team of an exciting start up in the Education space offering very enticing benefits. After four months into the job, I took a break! My story is one which clearly speaks of the power of self-discovery; appreciating and staying true to what I am and living out my real passion for agriculture. 

In a hangar made of boards in Nyalla, a neighbourhood on the outskirts of Douala, several dozen crates full of green or slightly ripened tomatoes are waiting to be delivered. "These are the orders of a trader," says William Mouachi Kameni, a 31-year old farmer. At the moment business is quite successful for this young man who holds a baccalaureate diploma. The price of a crate of tomatoes sold for 4000 CFA francs has doubled in the last two months. During the last season, he collected 100 tonnes for a profit of 1.5 million CFA francs. William hopes to earn more in the current season.

A few meters of the warehouse, a green area of cultivated land extends out of sight. Here, on a plot of 1000m2, he grows leek and vegetables. A little further, small green tomatoes spread over several furrows. Besides these horticultural products, the broad green leaves of cocoyam are visible in various parts of the field. Watermelons, chilli, peppers, potatoes, yams, cassava ... are other types of food grown on the farm.

I really appreciate the actions that this platform undertakes. I think it's this kind of space that young people need to become real agents of change.

Moses Owiny, Project Officer with the Women of Uganda Network (WOUGNET), kicks off the "Young women and Youth's Gender Perspectives in Agricultural Development" series that spotlight young professionals' experiences for women's empowerment in agricultural development. From research to private sector, mass media to civil society work, YPARD 2015 Gender series will feature, every month, young "gender champions" from different regions of the world. This series is part of YPARD work as special youth catalyst in the GAP : Gender in Agriculture Partnership.

In 2008, I graduated with a Bachelor Degree in Arts at Makerere University Kampala. By that time when as a student you start to face the world’s challenges and become independent, nobody could have foreseen that I would soon become so much interested and passionate about agriculture, youth, gender, ICTs and rural development in Uganda and globally.